fastigiate

or fas·tig·i·at·ed

[ fa-stij-ee-it, -eyt or fa-stij-ee-ey-tid ]
/ fæˈstɪdʒ i ɪt, -ˌeɪt or fæˈstɪdʒ iˌeɪ tɪd /

adjective

rising to a pointed top.
Zoology. joined together in a tapering adhering group.
Botany.
  1. erect and parallel, as branches.
  2. having such branches.

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Origin of fastigiate

1655–65; <Latin fastīgi(um) height, highest point + -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM fastigiate

sub·fas·tig·i·ate, adjectivesub·fas·tig·i·at·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for fastigiate

  • Fastigiate: flat-topped and of equal height: also applied to elytra that extend a little beyond the abdomen.

  • We are never surprised to find that an ordinary upright plant produces as a sport or mutation a pendulous, or fastigiate form.

    The Making of Species|Douglas Dewar

British Dictionary definitions for fastigiate

fastigiate

fastigiated

/ (fæˈstɪdʒɪɪt, -ˌeɪt) /

adjective biology

(of plants) having erect branches, often appearing to form a single column with the stem
(of parts or organs) united in a tapering group

Word Origin for fastigiate

C17: from Medieval Latin fastīgiātus lofty, from Latin fastīgium height
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012