fauchard

[ foh-shahr; French foh-shar ]
/ foʊˈʃɑr; French foʊˈʃar /

noun, plural fau·chards [foh-shahrz; French foh-shar]. /foʊˈʃɑrz; French foʊˈʃar/.

a shafted weapon having a knifelike blade with a convex cutting edge and a beak on the back for catching the blade of an aggressor's weapon.

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Origin of fauchard

<French; Old French fauchart, equivalent to fauch(er) to cut with a scythe (<Vulgar Latin *falcāre, derivative of Latin falx, stem falc- sickle) + -art-art

Words nearby fauchard

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for fauchard

  • She passed, with her two gentlemen, but the French sentinel barred the way, holding his fauchard thwartwise.

    A Monk of Fife|Andrew Lang
  • He dropped his fauchard over his shoulder, and stood aside, staring impudently at the Maiden, and muttering foul words.

    A Monk of Fife|Andrew Lang