fay

1
[fey]
See more synonyms for fay on Thesaurus.com

Origin of fay

1
1350–1400; Middle English faie, fei < Middle French feie, feeLatin Fāta Fate(def 6)

fay

2
[fey]
noun Obsolete.
  1. faith.

Origin of fay

2
1250–1300; Middle English fai, fei < Anglo-French, variant of feid faith

fay

3
[fey]
noun Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive.
  1. ofay.

Origin of fay

3
First recorded in 1925–30; by shortening

Fay

or Faye

[fey]
noun
  1. a female given name, form of Faith.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for fay

Contemporary Examples of fay

Historical Examples of fay

  • It will make all the difference in the world to Fay; and, on her account, to me also.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • Fay's was not, and neither letter bore any address in Bombay.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • FAY was still lying on her long chair in the verandah when Jan got in.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • Then Fay sent her to say good night to the children, who were just getting ready for bed.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • Do you mean to say, Fay, that he hasn't let you know where he is?

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker


British Dictionary definitions for fay

fay

1
noun
  1. a fairy or sprite
adjective
  1. of or resembling a fay
  2. informal pretentious or precious

Word Origin for fay

C14: from Old French feie, ultimately from Latin fātum fate

fay

2
verb
  1. to fit or be fitted closely or tightly

Word Origin for fay

Old English fēgan to join; related to Old High German fuogen, Latin pangere to fasten

fay

3
noun
  1. an obsolete word for faith

Word Origin for fay

C13: from Anglo-French feid; see faith
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fay
n.

"fairy," late 14c., from Old French fae (12c., Modern French fée), from Vulgar Latin *fata "goddess of fate," fem. singular of Latin fata (neuter plural), literally "the Fates" (see fate). Adjective meaning "homosexual" is attested from 1950s.

Fay

fem. proper name, in some cases from Middle English fei, Old French fei "faith," or else from fay "fairy."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper