fellow

[ fel-oh ]
/ ˈfɛl oʊ /

noun

verb (used with object)

to make or represent as equal with another.
Archaic. to produce a fellow to; match.

adjective

belonging to the same class or group; united by the same occupation, interests, etc.; being in the same condition: fellow students; fellow sufferers.

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Origin of fellow

before 1050; Middle English felowe, felawe, late Old English fēolaga < Old Norse fēlagi partner in a joint undertaking, equivalent to money, property (cognate with Old English feoh, German Vieh) + -lagi bedfellow, comrade; akin to lair1, lie2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for fellow

British Dictionary definitions for fellow (1 of 2)

fellow
/ (ˈfɛləʊ) /

noun

Word Origin for fellow

Old English fēolaga, from Old Norse fēlagi, one who lays down money, from money + lag a laying down

British Dictionary definitions for fellow (2 of 2)

Fellow
/ (ˈfɛləʊ) /

noun

a member of any of various learned societiesFellow of the British Academy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with fellow

fellow

see regular guy (fellow); strange bedfellows.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.