felt

1
[ felt ]
/ fɛlt /

verb

simple past tense and past participle of feel.

Definition for felt (2 of 3)

Origin of felt

2
before 1000; Middle English, Old English; cognate with German Filz; see filter

Definition for felt (3 of 3)

Origin of feel

before 900; Middle English felen, Old English fēlan; cognate with Old Saxon fōlian, German fühlen; akin to Old Norse falma to grope. See fumble

Related forms

o·ver·feel, verb, o·ver·felt, o·ver·feel·ing.re·feel, verb, re·felt, re·feel·ing.

Usage note

When the verb feel is used in the sense "to think or believe," it typically implies believing or having an opinion on the basis of emotion or intuition, even in circumstances unsupported by much real evidence. Although some usage experts object, such use is well established in English and can be traced as far back as Middle English. When feel is used specifically to express a subjective impression, it is often used with as if, as though, or that and followed by a full sentence: I felt as if my world had come to an end. He feels as though it is always raining. I feel that things will get better now. More informally, feel can be used without as if/as though/that : I feel he's guilty. And a full sentence does not have to follow: I felt his answer to be impolite. In the same sense of "to think or believe," an alternative phrase feel like is found in informal or casual speech. This use of feel like typically expresses an opinion or emotional sentiment with a softened or tentative tone: I feel like nothing is getting done here. I feel like he is just too arrogant. Though increasingly common, use of the phrase feel like has been criticized as lazy thinking that ignores real evidence, while avoiding confrontation and debate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for felt

British Dictionary definitions for felt (1 of 3)

felt

1
/ (fɛlt) /

verb

the past tense and past participle of feel

British Dictionary definitions for felt (2 of 3)

felt

2
/ (fɛlt) /

noun

  1. a matted fabric of wool, hair, etc, made by working the fibres together under pressure or by heat or chemical action
  2. (as modifier)a felt hat
any material, such as asbestos, made by a similar process of matting

verb

(tr) to make into or cover with felt
(intr) to become matted

Word Origin for felt

Old English; related to Old Saxon filt, Old High German filz felt, Latin pellere to beat, Greek pelas close; see anvil, filter

British Dictionary definitions for felt (3 of 3)

feel

/ (fiːl) /

verb feels, feeling or felt (fɛlt)

noun

Word Origin for feel

Old English fēlan; related to Old High German fuolen, Old Norse fālma to grope, Latin palma palm 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for felt

feel

[ fēl ]

v.

To perceive through the sense of touch.
To perceive as a physical sensation, as of pain.
To be conscious of a particular physical, mental, or emotional state.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with felt

feel


In addition to the idioms beginning with feel

  • feel bad
  • feel blue
  • feel for
  • feel free
  • feel in one's bones
  • feel like
  • feel like death
  • feel like oneself
  • feel like two cents
  • feel no pain
  • feel oneself
  • feel one's oats
  • feel one's way
  • feel out
  • feel out of place
  • feel put upon
  • feel someone up
  • feel the pinch
  • feel up to

also see:

  • (feel) at home
  • cop a feel
  • get the feel of
  • (feel) put upon

Also seefeelings.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.