ferrule

or fer·ule

[fer-uh l, -ool]

noun

verb (used with object), fer·ruled, fer·rul·ing.

to furnish with a ferrule.

Origin of ferrule

1605–15; alteration (apparently conformed to Latin ferrum iron, -ule) of verrel, verril, late Middle English virole < Middle French (cognate with Medieval Latin virola) < Latin viriola, equivalent to viri(a) bracelet + -ola -ole1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ferrule

Historical Examples of ferrule

  • He advised me to laugh at the ruler, the ferrule, and the rod.

    Percival Keene

    Frederick Marryat

  • It should be beaten in very slowly until it fits the ferrule.

  • The ferrule will look black when this happens and will thus be recognized.

  • A flat pan is laid on the bench and the ferrule stood upon it.

  • This method of tinning the ferrule will spoil the wiping solder.



British Dictionary definitions for ferrule

ferrule

ferule

noun

a metal ring, tube, or cap placed over the end of a stick, handle, or post for added strength or stability or to increase wear
a side opening in a pipe that gives access for inspection or cleaning
a bush, gland, small length of tube, etc, esp one used for making a joint

verb

(tr) to equip (a stick, etc) with a ferrule

Word Origin for ferrule

C17: from Middle English virole, from Old French virol, from Latin viriola a little bracelet, from viria bracelet; influenced by Latin ferrum iron
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ferrule
n.

"metal cap on a rod," 1610s, ferule, earlier verrel (early 15c.), from Old French virelle, from Latin viriola "bracelet," diminutive of viriae "bracelets," from a Gaulish word (cf. Old Irish fiar "bent, crooked"); spelling influenced by Latin ferrum "iron."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper