fickle

[ fik-uhl ]
/ ˈfɪk əl /

adjective

likely to change, especially due to caprice, irresolution, or instability; casually changeable: fickle weather.
not constant or loyal in affections: a fickle lover.

Origin of fickle

before 1000; Middle English fikel, Old English ficol deceitful, akin to fācen treachery, fician to deceive, gefic deception

SYNONYMS FOR fickle

1, 2 Fickle, inconstant, capricious, vacillating describe persons or things that are not firm or steady in affection, behavior, opinion, or loyalty. Fickle implies an underlying perversity as a cause for the lack of stability: the fickle seasons, disappointing as often as they delight; once lionized, now rejected by a fickle public. Inconstant suggests an innate disposition to change: an inconstant lover, flitting from affair to affair. Capricious implies unpredictable changeability arising from sudden whim: a capricious administration constantly and inexplicably changing its signals; a capricious and astounding reversal of position. Vacillating means changeable due to lack of resolution or firmness: an indecisive, vacillating leader, apparently incapable of a sustained course of action.

OTHER WORDS FROM fickle

fick·le·ness, nounun·fick·le, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for fickle

British Dictionary definitions for fickle

fickle
/ (ˈfɪkəl) /

adjective

changeable in purpose, affections, etc; capricious

Derived forms of fickle

fickleness, noun

Word Origin for fickle

Old English ficol deceitful; related to fician to wheedle, befician to deceive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012