Dictionary.com

field day

Save This Word!

noun

a day devoted to outdoor sports or athletic contests, as at a school.
an outdoor gathering; outing; picnic.
a day for military exercises and display.
an occasion or opportunity for unrestricted activity, amusement, etc.: The children had a field day with their new skateboards.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON PARENTHESES AND BRACKETS APLENTY!

Set some time apart to test your bracket symbol knowledge, and see if you can keep your parentheses, squares, curlies, and angles all straight!
Question 1 of 7
Let’s start with some etymology: What are the origins of the typographical word “bracket”?

Meet Grammar Coach

Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing

Meet Grammar Coach

Improve Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of field day

First recorded in 1740–50
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for field day

British Dictionary definitions for field day

field day

noun

a day spent in some special outdoor activity, such as nature study or sport
a day-long competition between amateur radio operators using battery or generator power, the aim being to make the most contacts with other operators around the world
military a day devoted to manoeuvres or exercises, esp before an audience
informal a day or time of exciting or successful activitythe children had a field day with their new toys
Australian
  1. a day or series of days devoted to the demonstration of farm machinery in country centres
  2. a combined open day and sale on a stud property
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with field day

field day

A time of great pleasure, activity, or opportunity, as in The press had a field day with this sensational murder trial. This colloquial expression, dating from the 1700s, originally referred to a day set aside for military maneuvers and exercises, and later was extended to a similar day for sports and games. Since the early 1800s it has been used more loosely.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
Book Your Online Tutor Now