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flamen

[ fley-muhn, -men ]

noun

, plural fla·mens, fla·mi·nes [flam, -, uh, -neez].
  1. (in ancient Rome) a priest.


flamen

/ ˈfleɪmɛn /

noun

  1. (in ancient Rome) any of 15 priests who each served a particular deity


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Word History and Origins

Origin of flamen1

1300–50; < Latin flamen (perhaps earlier *flādmen; akin to Old English blōtan to sacrifice); replacing Middle English flamin < Latin flāmin- (stem of flāmen )

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Word History and Origins

Origin of flamen1

C14: from Latin; probably related to Old English blōtan to sacrifice, Gothic blotan to worship

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Example Sentences

The influence of his uncle Marius caused him to be nominated priest of Jupiter (flamen dialis) at the age of fourteen.

Flamen, among the ancient Romans, was a priest or minister of sacrifice.

Suetonius (Csar, 1) says that Csar was designated (destinatus) flamen.

And indeed, the motives which the Flamen had assigned on former occasions, had by no means been nullified by Cornelius Cinna.

And yet, if anyone could wring this permission from the tyrant by the mere weight of personal influence, it was the Flamen.

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