flask

1
[ flask, flahsk ]
/ flæsk, flɑsk /

noun

a bottle, usually of glass, having a rounded body and a narrow neck, used especially in laboratory experimentation.
a flat metal or glass bottle for carrying in the pocket: a flask of brandy.
an iron container for shipping mercury, holding a standard commercial unit of 76 pounds (34 kg).
Metallurgy. a container into which sand is rammed around a pattern to form a mold.

Origin of flask

1
1375–1425; late Middle English: cask, keg < Anglo-French, Old French flaske < Late Latin flasca, earlier flascō, of uncertain origin; compare Old English flasce, flaxe, Old High German flasca (German flasche); cf. flagon

Definition for flask (2 of 2)

flask

2
[ flask, flahsk ]
/ flæsk, flɑsk /

noun Ordnance.

the armored plates making up the sides of a gun-carriage trail.
Obsolete. the bed of a gun carriage.

Origin of flask

2
1570–80; < dialectal French flasque cheek of a gun carriage < Late Latin flasca flask1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for flask

British Dictionary definitions for flask

flask

/ (flɑːsk) /

noun

a bottle with a narrow neck, esp used in a laboratory or for wine, oil, etc
Also called: hip flask a small flattened container of glass or metal designed to be carried in a pocket, esp for liquor
a container packed with sand to form a mould in a foundry
Also called: cask, coffin engineering a container used for transporting irradiated nuclear fuel

Word Origin for flask

C14: from Old French flasque, flaske, from Medieval Latin flasca, flasco, perhaps of Germanic origin; compare Old English flasce, flaxe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for flask

flask

[ flăsk ]

A rounded container with a long neck, used in laboratories.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.