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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

Origin of fold

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English verb folden, falden, faulden, Old English fealdan, faldan; cognate with Gothic falthan, Old Norse falda, German falten; akin to Latin plicāre “to fold,” plectere to plait, twine,” Greek plékein “to braid, knit”; cf. plait; see origin at -fold

OTHER WORDS FROM fold

fold·a·ble, adjective

Other definitions for fold (2 of 3)

fold2
[ fohld ]
/ foʊld /

noun
verb (used with object)
to confine (sheep or other domestic animals) in a fold.

Origin of fold

2
First recorded before 900; Middle English fold, fald, feld “sheepfold,” Old English fald, falod, falud “sheepfold, ox stall, stable”; akin to Old Saxon faled “pen, enclosure,” Middle Low German vaalt “pen, enclosure, manure heap,” Middle Dutch vaelt, vaelde

Other definitions for fold (3 of 3)

-fold

a native English suffix meaning “of so many parts,” or denoting multiplication by the number indicated by the stem or word to which the suffix is attached: twofold; manifold.

Origin of -fold

Middle English; Old English -fald, -feald, cognate with Old Frisian, Old Saxon -fald,German -falt,Old Norse -faldr,Gothic -falths, all representing the Germanic base of fold1; akin to Greek -ploos, -plous (see haplo-, diplo-), Latin -plus (see simple, double, etc.), -plex-plex
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use fold in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for fold (1 of 3)

fold1
/ (fəʊld) /

verb
noun
See also fold up

Derived forms of fold

foldable, adjective

Word Origin for fold

Old English fealdan; related to Old Norse falda , Old High German faldan, Latin duplus double, Greek haploos simple

British Dictionary definitions for fold (2 of 3)

fold2
/ (fəʊld) /

noun
  1. a small enclosure or pen for sheep or other livestock, where they can be gathered
  2. the sheep or other livestock gathered in such an enclosure
  3. a flock of sheep
  4. a herd of Highland cattle
a church or the members of it
any group or community sharing a way of life or holding the same values
verb
(tr) to gather or confine (sheep or other livestock) in a fold

Word Origin for fold

Old English falod; related to Old Saxon faled, Middle Dutch vaelt

British Dictionary definitions for fold (3 of 3)

-fold

suffix forming adjectives, suffix forming adverbs
having so many parts, being so many times as much or as many, or multiplied by so much or so manythreefold; three-hundredfold

Word Origin for -fold

Old English -fald, -feald
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for fold

fold
[ fōld ]

n.
A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.
In the embryo, a transient elevation or reduplication of tissue in the form of a lamina.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for fold

fold
[ fōld ]

A bend in a layer of rock or in another planar feature such as foliation or the cleavage of a mineral. Folds occur as the result of deformation, usually associated with plate-tectonic forces.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Other Idioms and Phrases with fold

fold

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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