foreordain

[ fawr-awr-deyn, fohr- ]
/ ˌfɔr ɔrˈdeɪn, ˌfoʊr- /

verb (used with object)

to ordain or appoint beforehand.
to predestine; predetermine.

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Origin of foreordain

First recorded in 1400–50, foreordain is from the late Middle English word forordeinen. See fore-, ordain

OTHER WORDS FROM foreordain

fore·or·dain·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for foreordain

  • Even that "in it to win it" slogan had a strong odor of arrogance about it, as if it was atempting to foreordain an outcome.

    Hillary, 16 Years After|Michael Tomasky|October 28, 2013|DAILY BEAST

British Dictionary definitions for foreordain

foreordain
/ (ˌfɔːrɔːˈdeɪn) /

verb

(tr; may take a clause as object) to determine (events, results, etc) in the future

Derived forms of foreordain

foreordainment or foreordination (ˌfɔːrɔːdɪˈneɪʃən), noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012