Idioms

    fore and aft, Nautical. in, at, or to both ends of a ship.
    to the fore,
    1. into a conspicuous place or position; to or at the front.
    2. at hand; ready; available.
    3. still alive.

Origin of fore

1
by construal of fore- as an adj., hence nominalized; fore and aft perhaps as translation of Dutch or Low German; sense “before” (defs 6, 9) perhaps continuation of Middle English, Old English fore in this sense, or as aphetic form of afore
Can be confusedfor fore four

fore

2
[fawr, fohr]

interjection Golf.

(used as a cry of warning to persons on a course who are in danger of being struck by the ball.)

Origin of fore

2
First recorded in 1875–80; probably aphetic variant of before

fore-

a prefix meaning “before” (in space, time, condition, etc.), “front,” “superior,” etc.: forehead; forecastle; forecast; foretell; foreman.

Origin of fore-

combining form representing Middle English, Old English for(e)
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Examples from the Web for fore

Contemporary Examples of fore

Historical Examples of fore


British Dictionary definitions for fore

fore

1

adjective

(usually in combination) located at, in, or towards the frontthe forelegs of a horse

noun

the front part
something located at, in, or towards the front
short for foremast
fore and aft located at or directed towards both ends of a vessela fore-and-aft rig
to the fore
  1. to or into the front or conspicuous position
  2. Scot and Irishalive or activeis your grandfather still to the fore?

adverb

at or towards a ship's bow
obsolete before

preposition, conjunction

a less common word for before

Word Origin for fore

Old English; related to Old Saxon, Old High German fora, Gothic faura, Greek para, Sanskrit pura

fore

2

interjection

(in golf) a warning shout made by a player about to make a shot

Word Origin for fore

C19: probably short for before

fore-

prefix

before in time or rankforesight; forefather; foreman
at or near the front; before in placeforehead; forecourt

Word Origin for fore-

Old English, from fore (adv)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fore
adv.

Old English fore (prep.) "before, in front of;" (adv.) "before, previously," common Germanic (cf. Old High German fora, Old Frisian fara, German vor, Gothic faiura, Old Norse fyrr "for"); from PIE *pr-, from root *per- (1) "forward, through" (see per).

As a noun, from 1630s. The warning cry in golf is first recorded 1878, probably a contraction of before.

adj.

mid-15c., "forward;" late 15c., "former, earlier;" early 16c., "at the front;" all senses apparently from fore- compounds, which frequently were written as two words in Middle English.

fore-

from fore (adv.), which was used as a prefix in Old English and other Germanic languages with a sense of "before in time, rank, position," etc., or designating the front part or earliest time.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with fore

fore

In addition to the idioms beginning with fore

  • fore and aft

also see:

  • to the fore
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.