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View synonyms for fox

fox

1

[ foks ]

noun

, plural fox·es, (especially collectively) fox.
  1. any of several carnivores of the dog family, especially those of the genus Vulpes, smaller than wolves, having a pointed, slightly upturned muzzle, erect ears, and a long, bushy tail.
  2. the fur of this animal.
  3. a cunning or crafty person.
  4. (initial capital letter) a member of a tribe of North American Algonquian Indians, formerly in Wisconsin, later merged with the Sauk tribe.
  5. (initial capital letter) the Algonquian language of the Fox, Sauk, and Kickapoo Indians.
  6. Bible. a scavenger, perhaps the jackal. Psalms 63:10; Lamentations 5:18.
  7. a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter F: replaced by Foxtrot.
  8. Slang. an attractive young woman or young man.


verb (used with object)

  1. to deceive or trick.
  2. to repair or make (a shoe) with leather or other material applied so as to cover or form part of the upper front.
  3. Obsolete. to intoxicate or befuddle.

verb (used without object)

  1. to act cunningly or craftily.
  2. (of book leaves, prints, etc.) to become foxed.

Fox

2

[ foks ]

noun

  1. Charles James, 1749–1806, British orator and statesman.
  2. George, 1624–91, English religious leader and writer: founder of the Society of Friends.
  3. John. John Foxe.
  4. John William, Jr., 1863–1919, U.S. novelist.
  5. Margaret, 1833–93, and her sister Katherine ( “Kate” ), 1839–92, U.S. spiritualist mediums, born in Canada.
  6. Sir William, 1812–93, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister 1856, 1861–62, 1869–72, 1873.

Fox

1

/ fɒks /

noun

  1. FoxFoxes a member of a North American Indian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River
  2. the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family


fox

2

/ fɒks /

noun

  1. any canine mammal of the genus Vulpes and related genera. They are mostly predators that do not hunt in packs and typically have large pointed ears, a pointed muzzle, and a bushy tail vulpine
  2. the fur of any of these animals, usually reddish-brown or grey in colour
  3. a person who is cunning and sly
  4. slang.
    a sexually attractive woman
  5. Bible
    1. a jackal
    2. an image of a false prophet
  6. nautical small stuff made from yarns twisted together and then tarred

verb

  1. tr to perplex or confound

    to fox a person with a problem

  2. to cause (paper, wood, etc) to become discoloured with spots, or (of paper, etc) to become discoloured, as through mildew
  3. tr to trick; deceive
  4. intr to act deceitfully or craftily
  5. informal.
    tr to pursue stealthily; tail
  6. informal.
    tr to chase and retrieve (a ball)
  7. obsolete.
    tr to befuddle with alcoholic drink

Fox

3

/ fɒks /

noun

  1. FoxCharles James17491806MBritishPOLITICS: statesmanPOLITICS: orator Charles James . 1749–1806, British Whig statesman and orator. He opposed North over taxation of the American colonies and Pitt over British intervention against the French Revolution. He advocated parliamentary reform and the abolition of the slave trade
  2. FoxGeorge16241691MEnglishRELIGION: Quaker religious leader George . 1624–91, English religious leader; founder (1647) of the Society of Friends (Quakers)
  3. FoxTerry19581981MCanadianSPORT AND GAMES: athlete Terry , full name Terrance Stanley Fox (1958–81). Canadian athlete: he lost a leg to cancer and subsequently attempted a coast-to-coast run across Canada to raise funds for cancer research
  4. FoxVicente1942MMexicanPOLITICS: politician Vicente ( Spanish viˈθɛnte). born 1942, Mexican politician; president of Mexico (2000-06)
  5. FoxSir William18121893MNew ZealandEnglishPOLITICS: statesmanPOLITICS: prime minister Sir William . 1812–93, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1856; 1861–62; 1869–72; 1873)
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Derived Forms

  • ˈfoxˌlike, adjective
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Other Words From

  • fox·like adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of fox1

First recorded before 900; 1960–65 fox fordef 8; Middle English, Old English; cognate with Old Saxon vohs, Middle Low German vos, Old High German fuhs ( German Fuchs ); vixen
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Word History and Origins

Origin of fox1

Old English; related to Old High German fuhs , Old Norse fōa fox, Sanskrit puccha tail; see vixen
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Idioms and Phrases

see crazy like a fox .
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Example Sentences

When surrounded by the threat of Hield’s spacing and Haliburton’s playmaking, Fox is better suited to present a threat from both the perimeter and paint.

CBS’s “The Equalizer,” ABC’s “Big Sky” and Fox’s “9-1-1” franchise have proven an ability to attract a large audience and, importantly, to hold their attentions week after week.

From Digiday

Like the rise of Fox News itself, Limbaugh, who came before Fox, gave a media voice to Republicans and conservatives.

From Time

Streaming services cannot produce NFL gamesWhen Amazon, Twitter and Yahoo have streamed NFL games, all they did was simulcast the TV broadcasts produced by CBS, NBC and Fox.

From Digiday

Bob’s Burgers is—with apologies to Futurama but not to Family Guy—Fox’s best animated comedy since The Simpsons.

From Time

Earlier this week, Huckabee ended his Fox News talk show so he could spend time mulling another bid for the Republican nomination.

Weirich said whenever she saw Fox, she was wearing something too tight.

“We won the war,” the Fox News personality proclaimed last week.

Presuming his demographic is largely the same as what it was when he was at Fox, they are not wealthy people.

Further, the two colleges selected may not even be representative of large campuses, Fox said.

There is an odd triangular-shaped hill that rises on one side very boldly and abruptly, called the Fox's Head.

Before I set about it I wish to see you and Mr. Fox, and will call any day you may appoint.

The revenue fox such a civil list would naturally be raised in America.

The town lives in these days solely upon agriculture, and the needs of neighbouring fox-hunters.

Thereupon the fisherman rushed to save his cloak, and the fox bolted out at the unguarded door.

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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