fratching

[ frach-ing ]
/ ˈfrætʃ ɪŋ /
|

noun British Dialect.

a quarrel; disagreement; argument.

Nearby words

  1. fraser, peter,
  2. fraser, simon,
  3. frass,
  4. frat,
  5. fratch,
  6. frater,
  7. fraternal,
  8. fraternal insurance,
  9. fraternal society,
  10. fraternal twin

Origin of fratching

First recorded in 1755–65; fratch + -ing1

fratch

[ frach ]
/ frætʃ /
British Dialect

verb (used with object)

to disagree; quarrel.

noun

a quarrel; argument; dispute.

Origin of fratch

1400–50; late Middle English fracchen to creak, of uncertain origin

Related formsfratch·er, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for fratching

  • He set up his fratching at breakfast acause his porridge was burnt, and kept at it all day.

    More Tales of the Ridings|Frederic Moorman
  • They were fratching—quarrelling—I could hear 'em as well as see 'em.

    The Borough Treasurer|Joseph Smith Fletcher


British Dictionary definitions for fratching

fratch

/ (frætʃ) /

noun

English dialect a quarrel
Derived Formsfratchy, adjective

Word Origin for fratch

C19: from obsolete fratch to make a harsh noise; perhaps of imitative origin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012