fully

[foo l-ee, foo l-lee]

adverb

entirely or wholly: You should be fully done with the work by now.
quite or at least: Fully half the class attended the ceremony.

Origin of fully

before 900; Middle English, Old English. See full1, -ly
Related formsqua·si-ful·ly, adverbun·ful·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for fully

Contemporary Examples of fully

Historical Examples of fully

  • Robert was fully aware that he was exposing himself to a horrible death.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • “We must call Kit into counsel, ere we can do that fully,” said Stephen.

    The Armourer's Prentices

    Charlotte M. Yonge

  • On that which he fully believed, he must act, and what did he fully believe?

    The Armourer's Prentices

    Charlotte M. Yonge

  • There are others, perhaps, who have not been fully sensible of the privileges which they enjoyed.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • She has fully explained to me your intentions, Sir, and what you mean to do for her.


British Dictionary definitions for fully

fully

adverb

to the greatest degree or extent; totally; entirely
amply; sufficiently; adequatelythey were fully fed
at leastit was fully an hour before she came
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fully
adv.

Old English fullice "entirely, perfectly, completely;" see full (adj.) + -ly (2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper