gale

1
[geyl]
See more synonyms for gale on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a very strong wind.
  2. Meteorology. a wind of 32–63 miles per hour (14–28 m/sec).
  3. a noisy outburst: a gale of laughter filled the room.
  4. Archaic. a gentle breeze.

Origin of gale

1
1540–50; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian dialect geil uproar, unrest, boiling

Synonyms for gale

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gale

2
[geyl]

Origin of gale

2
before 1000; Middle English gail, Old English gagel; cognate with German Gagel

Gale

[geyl]
noun
  1. Zo·na [zoh-nuh] /ˈzoʊ nə/, 1874–1938, U.S. novelist, short-story writer, playwright, and poet.
  2. a female or male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for gale

Contemporary Examples of gale

Historical Examples of gale

  • The gale must have set us a long way to leeward, as we did not get in for a fortnight.

    Ned Myers

    James Fenimore Cooper

  • That night the gale broke, and before morning it had materially moderated.

    Ned Myers

    James Fenimore Cooper

  • This gale commenced in the afternoon, and blew very heavily all that night.

    Ned Myers

    James Fenimore Cooper

  • During this gale, I had a proof of the truth that "where the treasure is, there will the heart be also."

    Ned Myers

    James Fenimore Cooper

  • I knew she was overloaded, and was afraid of the effects of a gale.

    Ned Myers

    James Fenimore Cooper


British Dictionary definitions for gale

gale

1
noun
  1. a strong wind, specifically one of force seven to ten on the Beaufort scale or from 45 to 90 kilometres per hour
  2. (often plural) a loud outburst, esp of laughter
  3. archaic, poetic a gentle breeze

Word Origin for gale

C16: of unknown origin

gale

2
noun
  1. short for sweet gale

Word Origin for gale

Old English gagel; related to Middle Low German gagel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gale
n.

"storm at sea," 1540s, from gaile "wind," origin uncertain, perhaps from Old Norse gol "breeze," or Old Danish gal "bad, furious" (often used of weather), from Old Norse galinn "bewitched." Or perhaps it is from Old English galan "to sing" (the second element in nightingale), or giellan "to yell." In technical meteorological use, a wind between 32 and 63 miles per hour.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper