galley

[ gal-ee ]
/ ˈgæl i /

noun, plural gal·leys.

a kitchen or an area with kitchen facilities in a ship, plane, or camper.
Nautical.
  1. a seagoing vessel propelled mainly by oars, used in ancient and medieval times, sometimes with the aid of sails.
  2. a long rowboat, as one used as a ship's boat by a warship or one used for dragging a seine.
  3. (formerly, in the U.S. Navy) a shoal-draft vessel, variously rigged, relying mainly on its sails but able to be rowed by sweeps.
Printing.
  1. a long, narrow tray, usually of metal, for holding type that has been set.
  2. galley proof.
  3. a rough unit of measurement, about 22 inches (56 cm), for type composition.

Origin of galley

1250–1300; Middle English galei(e) < Old French galee, galie, perhaps < Old Provençal galea < Late Greek galéa, galaía

Related forms

gal·ley·like, adjective
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Examples from the Web for galley

British Dictionary definitions for galley

galley

/ (ˈɡælɪ) /

noun

any of various kinds of ship propelled by oars or sails used in ancient or medieval times as a warship or as a trader
the kitchen of a ship, boat, or aircraft
any of various long rowing boats
printing
  1. (in hot-metal composition) a tray open at one end for holding composed type
  2. short for galley proof

Word Origin for galley

C13: from Old French galie, from Medieval Latin galea, from Greek galaia, of unknown origin; the sense development apparently is due to the association of a galley or slave ship with a ship's kitchen and hence with a hot furnace, trough, printer's tray, etc
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012