gapping

[ gap-ing ]
/ ˈgæp ɪŋ /

noun Linguistics.

a rule of transformational grammar by which repeated instances of a verb are deleted from conjoined sentences, as in the deletion of brought from Mary brought the bread, John the cheese, and Bill the wine.

Origin of gapping

Definition for gapping (2 of 2)

gap

[ gap ]
/ gæp /

noun

verb (used with object), gapped, gap·ping.

to make a gap, opening, or breach in.

verb (used without object), gapped, gap·ping.

to come open or apart; form or show a gap.

Origin of gap

1350–1400; Middle English < Old Norse gap chasm
Related formsgap·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for gapping

British Dictionary definitions for gapping (1 of 2)

gapping

/ (ˈɡæpɪŋ) /

noun

(in transformational grammar) a rule that deletes repetitions of a verb, as in the sentence Bill voted for Smith, Sam for McKay, and Dave for Harris
the act or practice of taking a gap year

British Dictionary definitions for gapping (2 of 2)

gap

/ (ɡæp) /

noun

verb gaps, gapping or gapped

(tr) to make a breach or opening in
Derived Formsgapless, adjectivegappy, adjective

Word Origin for gap

C14: from Old Norse gap chasm; related to gapa to gape, Swedish gap, Danish gab open mouth, opening
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gapping

gap


n.

early 14c. (mid-13c. in place names), from Old Norse gap "chasm," related to gapa "to gape," from PIE *ghai- "to yawn, gape" (see yawn (v.)). Originally "hole in a wall or hedge;" broader sense is 16c. In U.S., common in place names in reference to a break or pass in a long mountain chain (especially one that water flows through). As a verb from 1847.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for gapping

gap

[ găp ]

n.

An opening in a structure or surface; a cleft or breach.
An interval or discontinuity in any series or sequence.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.