gash

2
[gash]

Origin of gash

2
First recorded in 1700–10; origin uncertain

gash

3
[gash]
adjective Scot. Archaic.
  1. dreary or gloomy in appearance.

Origin of gash

3
First recorded in 1580–90; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for gasher

gash

1
verb
  1. (tr) to make a long deep cut or wound in; slash
noun
  1. a long deep cut or wound

Word Origin for gash

C16: from Old French garser to scratch, wound, from Vulgar Latin charissāre (unattested), from Greek kharassein to scratch

gash

2
adjective
  1. slang surplus to requirements; unnecessary, extra, or spare

Word Origin for gash

C20: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gasher

gash

n.

1540s, from Middle English garce (early 13c.), from Old North French garser "to scarify, cut, slash" (Old French *garse), apparently from Vulgar Latin *charassare, from Greek kharassein "engrave," from PIE *gher- "to scrape, scratch" (cf. character). Loss of -r- is characteristic (see ass (n.2)). Slang use for "vulva" dates to mid-1700s.

gash

v.

1560s, alteration of garsen (late 14c.), from Old North French garser "to cut, slash" (see gash (n.)). Related: Gashed; gashing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

gasher in Medicine

gash

[găsh]
v.
  1. To make a long, deep cut in; slash deeply.
n.
  1. A long, deep cut.
  2. A deep flesh wound.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.