genius

[ jeen-yuhs ]
/ ˈdʒin yəs /

noun, plural gen·ius·es for 2, 3, 8, gen·i·i [jee-nee-ahy] /ˈdʒi niˌaɪ/ for 6, 7, 9, 10.

Origin of genius

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English, from Latin: “tutelary deity or genius of a person”; cf. genus

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH genius

genius genus

Definition for genius (2 of 2)

genius loci
[ gen-i-oo s loh-kee; English jee-nee-uh s loh-sahy, -kahy ]
/ ˈgɛn ɪˌʊs ˈloʊ ki; English ˈdʒi ni əs ˈloʊ saɪ, -kaɪ /

noun Latin.

the guardian spirit of a place.
the distinctive character or atmosphere of a place with reference to the impression that it makes on the mind.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for genius

British Dictionary definitions for genius (1 of 2)

genius
/ (ˈdʒiːnɪəs, -njəs) /

noun plural -uses or for senses 5, 6 genii (ˈdʒiːnɪˌaɪ)

a person with exceptional ability, esp of a highly original kind
such ability or capacityMozart's musical genius
the distinctive spirit or creative nature of a nation, era, language, etc
a person considered as exerting great influence of a certain sortan evil genius
Roman myth
  1. the guiding spirit who attends a person from birth to death
  2. the guardian spirit of a place, group of people, or institution
Arabian myth (usually plural) a demon; jinn

Word Origin for genius

C16: from Latin, from gignere to beget

British Dictionary definitions for genius (2 of 2)

genius loci
/ Latin (ˈdʒiːnɪəs ˈləʊsaɪ) /

noun

the guardian spirit of a place
the special atmosphere of a particular place

Word Origin for genius loci

genius of the place
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012