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gerundive

[ juh-ruhn-div ]

noun

  1. (in Latin) a verbal adjective similar to the gerund in form and noting the obligation, necessity, or worthiness of the action to be done, as legendus in Liber legendus est, “The book is worth reading.” gerund ( def 1 ).


adjective

  1. resembling a gerund. gerund ( def 2 ).

gerundive

/ ˌdʒɛrənˈdaɪvəl; dʒɪˈrʌndɪv /

noun

  1. (in Latin grammar) an adjective formed from a verb, expressing the desirability of the activity denoted by the verb


adjective

  1. of or relating to the gerund or gerundive
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Derived Forms

  • geˈrundively, adverb
  • gerundival, adjective
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Other Words From

  • ger·un·di·val [jer-, uh, n-, dahy, -v, uh, l], adjective
  • ge·rundive·ly adverb
  • nonge·rundive adjective
  • nonge·rundive·ly adverb
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Word History and Origins

Origin of gerundive1

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English word from Late Latin word gerundīvus. See gerund, -ive
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Word History and Origins

Origin of gerundive1

C17: from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium gerund
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Example Sentences

Well, if you have, how are you going to spot the gerund and the gerundive?

Lovely, with a show of insouciance, bagged three gerunds and one gerundive.

This construction is especially frequent with phrases consisting of a gerundive and a noun.

The gerundive with esse denotes either physical necessity (must), or moral obligation (ought).

"Gerundive, sir," said P. Lentz promptly, observing Stover's ears in a state of revolution.

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gerundgervais