Idioms

Origin of move

1200–50; Middle English meven, moven < Anglo-French moverLatin movēre

Related forms

coun·ter·move, nouncoun·ter·move, verb, coun·ter·moved, coun·ter·mov·ing.out·move, verb (used with object), out·moved, out·mov·ing.un·moved, adjective

Synonym study

1. See advance. 22. See motion.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for get a move on

move

/ (muːv) /

verb

noun

Word Origin for move

C13: from Anglo-French mover, from Latin movēre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with get a move on (1 of 2)

get a move on


Also, get cracking or going or rolling. Hurry up; also, start working. For example, Get a move on, it's late, or Let's get cracking, kids, or It's time we got going, or The alarm went off ten minutes ago, so get rolling. The first colloquial expression dates from the late 1800s. The second term, also colloquial, employs the verb to crack in the sense of “travel with speed,” a usage dating from the early 1800s, but the idiom dates only from the first half of the 1900s. The third term dates from the late 1800s and also has other meanings; see get going. Get rolling alludes to setting wheels in motion and dates from the first half of the 1900s. Also see get busy; get on the stick.

Idioms and Phrases with get a move on (2 of 2)

move


In addition to the idioms beginning with move

  • move a muscle
  • move heaven and earth
  • move in
  • move on
  • move up

also see:

  • get a move on
  • on the move

Also see undermover.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.