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Origin of rush

1
First recorded in 1325–75; Middle English verb rushe(n), ruishe, from Anglo-French russher, russer, Old French re(h)usser, re(h)user, ruser, from Late Latin recūsāre “to push back,” Latin: “to refuse”; noun derivative of the verb; see also recuse, ruse

synonym study for rush

1. Rush, hurry, dash, speed imply swiftness of movement. Rush implies haste and sometimes violence in motion through some distance: to rush to the store. Hurry suggests a sense of strain or agitation, a breathless rushing to get to a definite place by a certain time: to hurry to an appointment. Dash implies impetuosity or spirited, swift movement for a short distance: to dash to the neighbor's. Speed means to go fast, usually by means of some type of transportation, and with some smoothness of motion: to speed to a nearby city.

OTHER WORDS FROM rush

rush·ing·ly, adverbun·rushed, adjective

Other definitions for rush (2 of 3)

rush2
[ ruhsh ]
/ rʌʃ /

noun
any grasslike plant of the genus Juncus, having pithy or hollow stems, found in wet or marshy places.Compare rush family.
any plant of the rush family.
any of various similar plants.
a stem of such a plant, used for making chair bottoms, mats, baskets, etc.
something of little or no value; trifle: not worth a rush.

Origin of rush

2
First recorded before 900; Middle English risch(e), ris(s)e, rich, Old English rysc, risc, rix; cognate with Dutch, Middle High German rusch, obsolete German Rusch, German Rausch

OTHER WORDS FROM rush

rushlike, adjective

Other definitions for rush (3 of 3)

Rush
[ ruhsh ]
/ rʌʃ /

noun
Benjamin, 1745–1813, U.S. physician and political leader: author of medical treatises.
his son, Richard, 1780–1859, U.S. lawyer, politician, and diplomat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use rush in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for rush (1 of 2)

rush1
/ (rʌʃ) /

verb
noun
adjective (prenominal)
requiring speed or urgencya rush job
characterized by much movement, business, etca rush period

Derived forms of rush

rusher, noun

Word Origin for rush

C14 ruschen, from Old French ruser to put to flight, from Latin recūsāre to refuse, reject

British Dictionary definitions for rush (2 of 2)

rush2
/ (rʌʃ) /

noun
any annual or perennial plant of the genus Juncus, growing in wet places and typically having grasslike cylindrical leaves and small green or brown flowers: family Juncaceae Many species are used to make baskets
any of various similar or related plants, such as the woodrush, scouring rush, and spike-rush
something valueless; a trifle; strawnot worth a rush
short for rush light

Derived forms of rush

rushlike, adjective

Word Origin for rush

Old English risce, rysce; related to Middle Dutch risch, Norwegian rusk, Old Slavonic rozga twig, rod
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with rush

rush

see bum's rush; fools rush in where angels fear to tread; mad rush; (rush) off someone's feet.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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