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get-out

[ get-out ]
/ ˈgɛtˌaʊt /
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noun

Commerce. the break-even point.
Chiefly British. a method or maneuver used to escape a difficult or embarrassing situation; cop-out: The scoundrel has used that get-out once too often.

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Idioms for get-out

    as all get-out, Informal. in the extreme; to the utmost degree: Once his mind is made up, he can be stubborn as all get-out.

Origin of get-out

First recorded in 1880–85; noun use of verb phrase get out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use get-out in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for get-out

get out

verb (adverb)

noun get-out

an escape, as from a difficult situation
theatre the process of moving out of a theatre the scenery, props, and costumes after a production
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with get-out

get out

1

Leave, escape, as in With good conduct he'll get out of prison in a few months, or In case of a fire, we just want to get out alive. [c. 1300] This phrase is also used as an imperative, ordering someone to depart. For example, Get out! You've no business being in here. [c. 1700] Also see get out of, def. 1.

2

Become known, as in Somehow the secret got out. [Late 1800s] Also see out in the open.

3

get something out. Publish something, as in Once we get out the newsletter, we can concentrate on other projects. [Late 1700s]

4

Produce a sound, as in The singer had a sore throat and could hardly get out a note. [First half of 1800s] Also see the subsequent idioms beginning with get out.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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