gibbon

[gib-uh n]

noun

any small, slender, long-armed arboreal anthropoid ape of the genus Hylobates, of the East Indies and southern Asia: all gibbon species are reduced in number and some are very rare.

Origin of gibbon

From French, dating back to 1760–70, name of uncertain origin used by Buffon

Gibbon

[gib-uh n]

noun

Edward,1737–94, English historian.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for gibbon

Contemporary Examples of gibbon

Historical Examples of gibbon

  • Gibbon said of Lady Elizabeth that she was the most alluring of women.

  • She began her daily hour of Gibbon after breakfast with great zeal.

    Is He Popenjoy?

    Anthony Trollope

  • Gibbon and Doubleday somehow deployed and seized a portion of the orchard.

    The Long Roll

    Mary Johnston

  • Doubleday and Gibbon suffered fearfully, and Ewell and Taliaferro suffered.

    The Long Roll

    Mary Johnston

  • We have only to consider the absurdity of a handy-volume Gibbon or a folio Lamb.

    The Booklover and His Books

    Harry Lyman Koopman


British Dictionary definitions for gibbon

gibbon

noun

any small agile arboreal anthropoid ape of the genus Hylobates, inhabiting forests in S Asia

Word Origin for gibbon

C18: from French, probably from an Indian dialect word

Gibbon

noun

Edward. 1737–94, English historian; author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776–88), controversial in its historical criticism of Christianity
Lewis Grassic (ˈɡræsɪk), real name James Leslie Mitchell . 1901–35, Scottish writer: best known for his trilogy of novels Scots Quair (1932–34)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gibbon
n.

1770, from French gibbon (18c.), supposedly from a word in the French colonies of India but not found in any language there. Brought to Europe by Marquis Joseph-François Dupleix (1697-1763), French governor general in India 1742-54. The surname is Old French Giboin, from Frankish *Geba-win "gift-friend," or in some cases a diminutive of Gibb, itself a familiar form of Gilbert.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper