glioma

[glahy-oh-muh]

Origin of glioma

From New Latin, dating back to 1865–70; see origin at glia, -oma
Related formsgli·o·ma·tous [glahy-oh-muh-tuh s, -om-uh-] /glaɪˈoʊ mə təs, -ˈɒm ə-/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for glioma

Contemporary Examples of glioma

  • Steven C. Moore et al., "Height, Body Mass Index, and Physical Activity in Relation to Glioma Risk."

    The Daily Beast logo
    15 Shocking Exercise Facts

    Anneli Rufus

    August 20, 2011

  • The exception: those 30-minutes-a-day-for-a-decade users, in whom the risk of glioma indeed increased 40 percent.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Are Cellphones Really a Cancer Risk?

    Sharon Begley

    June 1, 2011

Historical Examples of glioma


British Dictionary definitions for glioma

glioma

noun plural -mata (-mətə) or -mas
  1. a tumour of the brain and spinal cord, composed of neuroglia cells and fibres
Derived Formsgliomatous, adjective

Word Origin for glioma

C19: from New Latin, from Greek glia glue + -oma
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for glioma
n.

type of brain tumor, 1870, medical Latin, literally "glue tumor," from Greek glia "glue" + -oma.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

glioma in Medicine

glioma

[glē-ōmə, glī-]
n. pl. gli•o•mas
  1. A tumor that originates in the neuroglia of the brain or the spinal cord.
Related formsgli•oma•tous (-ŏmə-təs, -ōmə-) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.