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Question 1 of 10
Which of the options below is the best punctuation for the sentence? It__s your turn to pick the movie __ but your sister gets to pick the board game we _ re going to play.

Idioms for go

Origin of go

1
before 900; Middle English gon, Old English gān; cognate with Old High German gēn, German gehen
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for go along (1 of 4)

go along

verb

(intr, adverb often foll by with) to refrain from disagreement; assent

British Dictionary definitions for go along (2 of 4)

GO
/ military /

abbreviation for

general order

British Dictionary definitions for go along (3 of 4)

go1
/ (ɡəʊ) /

verb goes, going, went or gone (mainly intr)

noun plural goes

adjective

(postpositive) informal functioning properly and ready for action: esp used in astronauticsall systems are go

Word Origin for go

Old English gān; related to Old High German gēn, Greek kikhanein to reach, Sanskrit jahāti he forsakes

British Dictionary definitions for go along (4 of 4)

go2

I-go

/ (ɡəʊ) /

noun

a game for two players in which stones are placed on a board marked with a grid, the object being to capture territory on the board

Word Origin for go

from Japanese
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with go along

go along

1

Move on, proceed, as in She was going along, singing a little song. This expression is also used as an imperative meaning “be off” or “get away from here,” as in The police ordered them to go along. [First half of 1500s]

2

Also, go along with. Cooperate, acquiesce, agree. For example, Don't worry about enough votes—we'll go along, or I'll go along with you on that issue. [c. 1600]

3

Accompany someone, as in I'll go along with you until we reach the gate. [c. 1600] This usage gave rise to the phrase go along for the ride, meaning “to accompany someone but without playing an active part,” as in I won't be allowed to vote at this meeting so I'm just going along for the ride.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.