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Pore Over vs. Pour OverSince pour is a common word and sounds identical to pore, many English speakers use the verb pour in the verb phrase pore over meaning “to meditate or ponder intently.” 
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RELATED WORDS

inspect, rehearse, scan, read, examine, repeat, skim, analyze, investigate, peruse, practice, reiterate, revise, study, click, go, prove

Nearby words

gnp, gnrh, gns., gnu, gnvq, go, go a long way, go a long way toward, go about, go after, go against

Idioms

Origin of go

1
before 900; Middle English gon, Old English gān; cognate with Old High German gēn, German gehen
SYNONYMS FOR go
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for go over (1 of 4)

go over


verb (intr)

British Dictionary definitions for go over (2 of 4)

GO

/ military /

abbreviation for

general order

British Dictionary definitions for go over (3 of 4)

go

1
/ (ɡəʊ) /

verb goes, going, went or gone (mainly intr)

noun plural goes

adjective

(postpositive) informal functioning properly and ready for action: esp used in astronauticsall systems are go

Word Origin for go

Old English gān; related to Old High German gēn, Greek kikhanein to reach, Sanskrit jahāti he forsakes

British Dictionary definitions for go over (4 of 4)

go

2

I-go

/ (ɡəʊ) /

noun

a game for two players in which stones are placed on a board marked with a grid, the object being to capture territory on the board

Word Origin for go

from Japanese
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with go over

go over


1

Examine, review. For example, They went over the contract with great care, or I think we should go over the whole business again. This term originated in the late 1500s, then meaning “consider in sequence.”

2

Gain acceptance or approval, succeed, as in I hope the play goes over. This term is sometimes elaborated to go over big or go over with a bang for a big success, and go over like a lead balloon for a dismal failure. [Early 1900s]

3

Rehearse, as in Let's go over these lines one more time. [Second half of 1700s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.