go-to

[ goh-too ]
/ ˈgoʊˌtu /

adjective Informal.

being a person who can be turned to for expert knowledge, advice, or reliable performance, especially in a crucial situation: He's our go-to guy in a budget crisis.
noting something that can always be relied on to bring satisfaction, success, or good results: my go-to recipe for cheesecake.
(in team sports) being a player who can be relied on to score, especially at a crucial time in the game.

QUIZZES

WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for go-to

go to

verb (intr, preposition)

to be awarded tothe Nobel prize last year went to a Scot
go to it to tackle a task vigorously

interjection

archaic an exclamation expressing surprise, encouragement, etc

adjective go-to

  1. (of a person) extremely dependablethe go-to guy in the team
  2. (of a place) popularly visitedgo-to destinations
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with go-to

go to

1

See going to.

2

Also, go toward. Contribute to a result, as in Can you name the bones that go to make the arms and legs? or The director has a good eye for seeing what will go toward an entire scene. [c. 1600]

3

Begin, start, as in By the time she went to call, she'd forgotten what she wanted to say. The related idiom go to it means “get started, get going.” P.G. Wodehouse used it in Louder Funnier (1932): “Stoke up and go to it.” [First half of 1700s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.