go-to

[ goh-too ]
/ ˈgoʊˌtu /

adjective Informal.

being a person who can be turned to for expert knowledge, advice, or reliable performance, especially in a crucial situation: He's our go-to guy in a budget crisis.
noting something that can always be relied on to bring satisfaction, success, or good results: my go-to recipe for cheesecake.
(in team sports) being a player who can be relied on to score, especially at a crucial time in the game.

Definition for go to (2 of 2)

Origin of go

1
before 900; Middle English gon, Old English gān; cognate with Old High German gēn, German gehen
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for go to (1 of 4)

go to


verb (intr, preposition)

to be awarded tothe Nobel prize last year went to a Scot
go to it to tackle a task vigorously

interjection

archaic an exclamation expressing surprise, encouragement, etc

adjective go-to

  1. (of a person) extremely dependablethe go-to guy in the team
  2. (of a place) popularly visitedgo-to destinations

British Dictionary definitions for go to (2 of 4)

GO

/ military /

abbreviation for

general order

British Dictionary definitions for go to (3 of 4)

go

1
/ (ɡəʊ) /

verb goes, going, went or gone (mainly intr)

noun plural goes

adjective

(postpositive) informal functioning properly and ready for action: esp used in astronauticsall systems are go

Word Origin for go

Old English gān; related to Old High German gēn, Greek kikhanein to reach, Sanskrit jahāti he forsakes

British Dictionary definitions for go to (4 of 4)

go

2

I-go

/ (ɡəʊ) /

noun

a game for two players in which stones are placed on a board marked with a grid, the object being to capture territory on the board

Word Origin for go

from Japanese
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with go to

go to


1

See going to.

2

Also, go toward. Contribute to a result, as in Can you name the bones that go to make the arms and legs? or The director has a good eye for seeing what will go toward an entire scene. [c. 1600]

3

Begin, start, as in By the time she went to call, she'd forgotten what she wanted to say. The related idiom go to it means “get started, get going.” P.G. Wodehouse used it in Louder Funnier (1932): “Stoke up and go to it.” [First half of 1700s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.