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goliard

[ gohl-yerd ]

noun

, (sometimes initial capital letter)
  1. one of a class of wandering scholar-poets in Germany, France, and England, chiefly in the 12th and 13th centuries, noted as the authors of satirical Latin verse written in celebration of conviviality, sensual pleasures, etc.


goliard

/ ˈɡəʊljəd; ɡəʊlˈjɑːdɪk /

noun

  1. one of a number of wandering scholars in 12th- and 13th-century Europe famed for their riotous behaviour, intemperance, and composition of satirical and ribald Latin verse


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Derived Forms

  • goliardic, adjective

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Other Words From

  • gol·iar·der·y [gohl-, yahr, -d, uh, -ree], noun
  • gol·iardic adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of goliard1

1275–1325; Middle English < Old French goliart, goliard drunkard, glutton, equivalent to gole throat ( French geule )+ -ard -ard ( def )

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Word History and Origins

Origin of goliard1

C15: from Old French goliart glutton, from Latin gula gluttony

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Example Sentences

I come uninvited, says the goliard to the bishop, ready for dinner; such is my fate, never to dine invited.

Goliard, gol′yard, n. a medieval monk who amused his superiors at table by merry jests.

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