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Gone With the Wind

[ wind ]
/ wɪnd /
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noun
a novel (1936) by Margaret Mitchell.
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Words nearby Gone With the Wind

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use Gone With the Wind in a sentence

Cultural definitions for Gone With the Wind

Gone With the Wind

(1936) A phenomenally popular novel by the American author Margaret Mitchell. Set in Georgia in the period of the Civil War, it tells of the three marriages of the central character, Scarlett O'Hara, and of the devastation caused by the war.

notes for Gone With the Wind

The film version of Gone With the Wind, which premiered in 1939, is one of the most successful films ever made.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Other Idioms and Phrases with Gone With the Wind

gone with the wind

Disappeared, gone forever, as in With these unforeseen expenses, our profits are gone with the wind. This phrase became famous as the title of Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel, which alludes to the Civil War's causing the disappearance of a Southern way of life. It mainly serves as an intensifier of gone.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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