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Gorgon

[ gawr-guhn ]
/ ˈgɔr gən /
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noun

Classical Mythology. any of three sister monsters commonly represented as having snakes for hair, wings, brazen claws, and eyes that turned anyone looking into them to stone. Medusa, the only mortal Gorgon, was beheaded by Perseus.
(lowercase) a mean, ugly, or repulsive woman.

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Origin of Gorgon

1350–1400; Middle English <Latin Gorgōn<Greek Gorgṓ, derivative of gorgós dreadful

OTHER WORDS FROM Gorgon

Gor·go·ni·an [gawr-goh-nee-uhn], /gɔrˈgoʊ ni ən/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for Gorgon

Gorgon
/ (ˈɡɔːɡən) /

noun

Greek myth any of three winged monstrous sisters, Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa, who had live snakes for hair, huge teeth, and brazen claws
(often not capital) informal a fierce or unpleasant woman

Word Origin for Gorgon

via Latin Gorgō from Greek, from gorgos terrible
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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