Advertisement

Advertisement

View synonyms for grandfather clause

grandfather clause

noun

  1. U.S. History. a clause in the constitutions of some Southern states after 1890 intended to permit white people to vote while disfranchising Black people: it exempted from new literacy and property qualifications for voting those men entitled to vote before 1867 and their lineal descendants.
  2. any legal provision that exempts a business, class of persons, etc., from a new government regulation that would affect prior rights and privileges.


grandfather clause

noun

  1. history a clause in the constitutions of several Southern states that waived electoral literacy requirements for lineal descendants of people voting before 1867, thus ensuring the franchise for illiterate White people: declared unconstitutional in 1915
  2. a clause in legislation that forbids or regulates an activity so that those engaged in it are exempted from the ban


Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of grandfather clause1

An Americanism dating back to 1895–1900

Discover More

Example Sentences

The measure contained no grandfather clause for minors who were already undergoing treatment.

This enactment, known as the "grandfather clause," went far toward the elimination of the negro.

This restriction has been explained as coming down from "the grandfather clause" inserted in early legislation.

I've been ten years out of college, and when I go back they'll pull the grandfather clause on me and wheel me in early nights.

But the writer does not believe in the principle nor in the necessity for a "grandfather clause."

In 1898 Louisiana passed an amendment inventing the so-called "grandfather clause."

Advertisement

Word of the Day

tortuous

[tawr-choo-uhs ]

Meaning and examples

Start each day with the Word of the Day in your inbox!

By clicking "Sign Up", you are accepting Dictionary.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policies.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


grandfathergrandfather clock