gray

1

or grey

[grey]
|

adjective, gray·er, gray·est.

noun

verb (used with or without object)

to make or become gray.

Origin of gray

1
before 900; Middle English; Old English grǣg; cognate with German grau
Related formsgray·ly, adverbgray·ness, nounun·grayed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for grayness

Contemporary Examples of grayness

  • The grayness of the whole city—the houses, the back streets, the crumbling fences.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Ordinary Monsters

    Richard Cohen

    December 11, 2008

  • I was living in East Berlin for weeks in a row and experiencing the grayness of East Berlin.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Ordinary Monsters

    Richard Cohen

    December 11, 2008

Historical Examples of grayness

  • She was what is called a graue Schwester; and of a truth she seemed the incarnation of grayness.

    A Day's Ride

    Charles James Lever

  • And the siren sent its dismal blasts out into the grayness all about.

  • Anders perceived the delusion behind the grayness, and then there was nothing at all.

    Warm

    Robert Sheckley

  • Now and then another car passed him, specter-like amid the grayness.

    Glory of Youth

    Temple Bailey

  • Even the grayness of the ash gave back no light; there was none to give.

    Plotting in Pirate Seas

    Francis Rolt-Wheeler


British Dictionary definitions for grayness

gray

1

adjective, noun, verb

a variant spelling (now esp US) of grey
Derived Formsgrayish, adjectivegrayly, adverbgrayness, noun

gray

2

noun

the derived SI unit of absorbed ionizing radiation dose or kerma equivalent to an absorption per unit mass of one joule per kilogram of irradiated material. 1 gray is equivalent to 100 radsSymbol: Gy

Word Origin for gray

C20: named after Louis Harold Gray (1905–65), English physicist

Gray

noun

Thomas. 1716–71, English poet, best known for his Elegy written in a Country Churchyard (1751)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for grayness

gray

adj.

Old English græg (Mercian grei), from Proto-Germanic *grisja- "gray" (cf. Old Norse grar, Old Frisian gre, Middle Dutch gra, Dutch graw, Old High German grao, German grau), with no certain cognates outside Germanic. French gris, Spanish gris, Italian grigio, Medieval Latin griseus are Germanic loan-words.

The distinction between British grey and U.S. gray developed 20c. The noun is c.1200, from the adjective. Gray as figurative for "Southern troops in the U.S. Civil War" is first recorded 1863, in reference to their uniform color. Expression the gray mare is the better horse in reference to households ruled by wives is recorded from 1540s. The verb is 1610s (with an isolated instance from late 14c.). Related: Grayed; graying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

grayness in Medicine

gray

[grā]

n.

A unit for a specific absorbed dose of radiation equal to 100 rads.

Gray

Henry 1825?-1861

British anatomist whose work Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical (1858), known as Gray's Anatomy, remains a standard text.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

grayness in Science

gray

[grā]

The SI derived unit used to measure the energy absorbed by a substance per unit weight of the substance when exposed to radiation. One gray is equal to one joule per kilogram, or 100 rads. The gray is named after British physicist Louis Harold Gray (1905-1965).
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with grayness

gray

In addition to the idioms beginning with gray

  • gray area
  • gray matter

also see:

  • get gray hair from
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.