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Grimaldi

[ gri-mahl-dee, -mawl- ]

noun

  1. Joseph, 1779–1837, English actor, mime, and clown.
  2. a walled plain in the third quadrant of the face of the moon: about 120 miles (195 km) in diameter.


Grimaldi

1

/ ɡrɪˈmɔːldɪ /

noun

  1. GrimaldiJoseph17791837MEnglishTHEATRE: actorTHEATRE: clown Joseph. 1779–1837, English actor, noted as a clown in pantomime


Grimaldi

2

/ ɡrɪˈmɔːldɪ /

noun

  1. a large crater in the SE quadrant of the moon, about 190 km in diameter, which is conspicuous because of its dark floor
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Word History and Origins

Origin of Grimaldi1

named after Francesco Maria Grimaldi (1618–63), Italian physicist
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Example Sentences

The following year, he also acknowledged an American daughter, Jazmin Grace Grimaldi, born to a California woman.

The following year, he also acknowledged an American daughter, Jazmin Grace Grimaldi, now a teenager, born to a California woman.

“Grimaldi was pantomime,” writes Andrew McConnell Scott in his biography, The Pantomime Life of Joseph Grimaldi.

Intercepted letters between Fuentes and Grimaldi proved that a treaty had been signed between them on August 15.

Pitt took the same ground as before, and declared that his opinion had been strengthened by one of Grimaldi's intercepted letters.

It was late one night in 1807 that Grimaldi, the most famous of all clowns, was robbed on Highgate Hill by two footpads.

Grimaldi, however, afterwards pursued his ghost, and buffeted the father in his grave.

Grimaldi, the son of Queen Charlottes dentist, was born in 1779.

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