hall

[ hawl ]
/ hɔl /

noun

Origin of hall

before 900; Middle English; Old English heall; cognate with Old Norse hǫll,German Halle; akin to Old English helan to cover, hide, Latin cēlāre to hide (see conceal)

OTHER WORDS FROM hall

subhall, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH hall

hall , haul.

Definition for hall (2 of 2)

Hall
[ hawl ]
/ hɔl /

noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for hall

British Dictionary definitions for hall (1 of 2)

hall
/ (hɔːl) /

noun

Word Origin for hall

Old English heall; related to Old Norse höll, Old High German halla hall, Latin cela cell 1, Old Irish cuile cellar, Sanskrit śālā hut; see hell

British Dictionary definitions for hall (2 of 2)

Hall
/ (hɔːl) /

noun

Charles Martin. 1863–1914, US chemist: discovered the electrolytic process for producing aluminium
Sir John. 1824–1907, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1879–82)
Sir Peter. born 1930, English stage director: director of the Royal Shakespeare Company (1960–73) and of the National Theatre (1973–88)
(Margueritte) Radclyffe . 1883–1943, British novelist and poet. Her frank treatment of a lesbian theme in the novel The Well of Loneliness (1928) led to an obscenity trial
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for hall

Hall
[ hôl ]
Granville Stanley 1844-1924

American psychologist who established an experimental psychology laboratory at Johns Hopkins University (1882), founded child psychology, and profoundly influenced educational psychology.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.