hall

[ hawl ]
/ hɔl /

noun

Origin of hall

before 900; Middle English; Old English heall; cognate with Old Norse hǫll, German Halle; akin to Old English helan to cover, hide, Latin cēlāre to hide (see conceal)

OTHER WORDS FROM hall

sub·hall, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH hall

hall haul

Definition for hall (2 of 2)

Hall
[ hawl ]
/ hɔl /

noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hall

British Dictionary definitions for hall (1 of 2)

hall
/ (hɔːl) /

noun

Word Origin for hall

Old English heall; related to Old Norse höll, Old High German halla hall, Latin cela cell 1, Old Irish cuile cellar, Sanskrit śālā hut; see hell

British Dictionary definitions for hall (2 of 2)

Hall
/ (hɔːl) /

noun

Charles Martin. 1863–1914, US chemist: discovered the electrolytic process for producing aluminium
Sir John. 1824–1907, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1879–82)
Sir Peter. born 1930, English stage director: director of the Royal Shakespeare Company (1960–73) and of the National Theatre (1973–88)
(Margueritte) Radclyffe . 1883–1943, British novelist and poet. Her frank treatment of a lesbian theme in the novel The Well of Loneliness (1928) led to an obscenity trial
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for hall

Hall
[ hôl ]
Granville Stanley 1844-1924

American psychologist who established an experimental psychology laboratory at Johns Hopkins University (1882), founded child psychology, and profoundly influenced educational psychology.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.