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View synonyms for halo

halo

1

[ hey-loh ]

noun

, plural ha·los, ha·loes.
  1. Also called nimbus. a geometric shape, usually in the form of a disk, circle, ring, or rayed structure, traditionally representing a radiant light around or above the head of a divine or sacred personage, an ancient or medieval monarch, etc.
  2. an atmosphere or quality of glory, majesty, sanctity, or the like:

    The "profession" of a medieval lord cast a halo around him and made him a ruler of men.

  3. Meteorology. any of a variety of bright circles or arcs centered on the sun or moon, caused by the refraction or reflection of light by ice crystals suspended in the earth's atmosphere and exhibiting prismatic coloration ranging from red inside to blue outside ( corona ).
  4. Astronomy. a spherical cloud of gas clusters and stars that form part of a spiral galaxy.
  5. any of various other things resembling a halo, especially a lighter or differently colored area surrounding an object:

    I think the scab was from some kind of bite, and now there's a halo around it with bruising.

  6. Also called Cel·li·ni's ha·lo [ch, uh, -, lee, -neez , hey, -loh]. Heiligenschein ( def ).
  7. an undesirable bright or dark ring surrounding an image on the fluorescent screen of a television tube, due to some fault either in transmission or reception.


verb (used with object)

, ha·loed, ha·lo·ing.
  1. to surround with a halo.

verb (used without object)

, ha·loed, ha·lo·ing.
  1. to form a halo.

halo-

2
  1. a combining form meaning “salt,” used in the formation of compound words ( halophyte ); sometimes specialized as a combining form of halogen ( halothane ).

halo

1

/ ˈheɪləʊ /

noun

  1. a disc or ring of light around the head of an angel, saint, etc, as in painting or sculpture
  2. the aura surrounding an idealized, famous, or admired person, thing, or event
  3. a circle of light around the sun or moon, caused by the refraction of light by particles of ice
  4. astronomy a spherical cloud of stars surrounding the Galaxy and other spiral galaxies


verb

  1. to surround with or form a halo

halo-

2

combining_form

  1. indicating salt or the sea

    halophyte

  2. relating to or containing a halogen

    halothane

halo

/ /

  1. A hazy ring of colored light in the sky around the Sun, Moon, or a similar bright object. A halo is caused by the reflection and refraction of light through atmospheric ice crystals.


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Derived Forms

  • ˈhalo-ˌlike, adjective
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Other Words From

  • un·ha·loed adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of halo1

First recorded in 1555–65; from Latin, accusative of halōs “circle around the sun or moon,” from Greek hálōs “threshing floor; grain on a threshing floor; shield; halo”

Origin of halo2

< Greek, combining form of háls salt
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Word History and Origins

Origin of halo1

C16: from Medieval Latin, from Latin halōs circular threshing floor, from Greek

Origin of halo2

from Greek hals, hal- sea, salt
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Example Sentences

“You gotta play ‘Halo’ for your angel-fish,” she instructs.

For Microsoft in 2014, this meant showing the new Call of Duty, a Halo collection, and other entries in established franchises.

Maybe someday, the ARC4 system could even turn your walk to work into a game of Halo.

Functionally, the end product makes walking around look a lot like playing a first-person shooter game like Halo.

The star is the cream itself, as opulent as crème fraiche, with vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, etc., serving as a sort of halo.

The sun was on Evelyn Clifford's hair, burnishing it to a halo of gold under the white hat.

With the halo of this action still surrounding him, in March, 1796, he first came into direct connection with Bonaparte.

For one deathless moment his genius had carried him to the heights, and a white blaze of publicity had given him a halo of glory.

Her flower in one hand and the umbrella making a bright halo round her, she looks like a little idol from overseas.

The revolution of 1688 dissipated the halo which had shed a fictitious light round the throne.

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