halter

1
[hawl-ter]

noun

verb (used with object)

to put a halter on; restrain as by a halter.
to hang (a person).

adjective

(of a garment) having a neckline consisting of a cord, strap, band, or the like that is attached to or forms part of the front of a backless and sleeveless bodice and extends around the neck: a halter dress.

Origin of halter

1
before 1000; Middle English; Old English hælfter; cognate with German Halfter
Related formshal·ter·like, adjectiveun·hal·tered, adjectiveun·hal·ter·ing, adjective

halter

2
[hal-ter]

noun, plural hal·te·res [hal-teer-eez] /hælˈtɪər iz/.

one of a pair of slender, club-shaped appendages on the hindmost body segment of a fly, serving to maintain its balance in flight.

Origin of halter

2
< New Latin, special use of Latin halter jumping weight < Greek háltēr, akin to hállesthai, Latin salīre to jump (see saltant)
Also called balancer.

halter

3
[hawl-ter]

noun

a person who halts or brings to a stop.

Origin of halter

3

halter

4
[hawl-ter]

noun

a person who halts, falters, or hesitates.

Origin of halter

4
late Middle English word dating back to 1400–50; see origin at halt2, -er1

halt

2
[hawlt]

verb (used without object)

to falter, as in speech, reasoning, etc.; be hesitant; stumble.
to be in doubt; waver between alternatives; vacillate.
Archaic. to be lame; walk lamely; limp.

adjective

Archaic. lame; limping.

noun

Archaic. lameness; a limp.
(used with a plural verb) lame people, especially severely lamed ones (usually preceded by the): the halt and the blind.

Origin of halt

2
before 900; Middle English; Old English healt; cognate with Old High German halz, Old Norse haltr, Gothic halts, akin to Latin clādēs damage, loss
Related formshalt·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for halter

Contemporary Examples of halter

  • “There are many after-hours events where you can show off your halter, strapless shirt or dress, or mini-skirt,” Royer wrote.

    The Daily Beast logo
    A Handy Guide To Help You Dress for CPAC

    Misty White Sidell

    March 13, 2013

  • In an interview with The Daily Beast, Halter sounded at least a tad reluctant to take on the mantle of the Great Progressive Hope.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Attack from the Left

    Benjamin Sarlin

    March 2, 2010

  • The most helpful hint was that twisting the sashes was the key to the halter top.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Can an $895 Dress Be a Bargain?

    Nicole LaPorte

    November 29, 2009

  • It featured a brief that extended halfway up the midriff, just below the breasts, and was held up with a halter neck tie.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Return of the Monokini

    Renata Espinosa

    July 22, 2009

  • She was 5-foot-2, 105 pounds, wearing a miniskirt and a halter top with a bare midriff.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Bill O'Reilly Is Stalking Me

    Amanda Terkel

    March 30, 2009

Historical Examples of halter

  • Put a halter round her neck, and sell her for a pot of beer.

    The Armourer's Prentices

    Charlotte M. Yonge

  • I've no halter the way I can ride down on the mare, and I must go now quickly.

  • He struck the horse over the flank with the loose end of the halter rein.

  • They may win, and if they do, it will be our necks that will be put into the yoke--or the halter.

    In the Valley

    Harold Frederic

  • When they reached her gate, it was she who took the halter from Elvin's hand, and tied the horse.

    Meadow Grass

    Alice Brown


British Dictionary definitions for halter

halter

noun

a rope or canvas headgear for a horse, usually with a rope for leading
Also called: halterneck a style of woman's top fastened behind the neck and waist, leaving the back and arms bare
a rope having a noose for hanging a person
death by hanging

verb (tr)

to secure with a halter or put a halter on
to hang (someone)

Word Origin for halter

Old English hælfter; related to Old High German halftra, Middle Dutch heliftra

halt

1

noun

an interruption or end to activity, movement, or progress
mainly British a minor railway station, without permanent buildings
call a halt to put an end (to something); stop

noun, sentence substitute

a command to halt, esp as an order when marching

verb

to come or bring to a halt

Word Origin for halt

C17: from the phrase to make halt, translation of German halt machen, from halten to hold 1, stop

halt

2

verb (intr)

(esp of logic or verse) to falter or be defective
to waver or be unsure
archaic to be lame

adjective

archaic
  1. lame
  2. (as collective noun; preceded by the)the halt

noun

archaic lameness

Word Origin for halt

Old English healt lame; related to Old Norse haltr, Old High German halz lame, Greek kólos maimed, Old Slavonic kladivo hammer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for halter
n.

Old English hælftre "rope for leading a horse," from West Germanic *halftra- "that by which something is held" (cf. Old Saxon haliftra "halter," Old High German halftra, Middle Dutch halfter; see helve). In women's clothing sense, originally "strap attached to the top of a backless bodice and looped around the neck," 1935, later extended to the tops themselves.

halt

n.

"a stop, a halting," 1590s, from French halte (16c.) or Italian alto, ultimately from German Halt, imperative from Old High German halten "to hold" (see hold (v.)). A German military command borrowed into the Romanic languages 16c. The verb in this sense is from 1650s, from the noun. Related: Halted; halting.

halt

adj.

"lame," in Old English lemphalt "limping," from Proto-Germanic *haltaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian halt, Old Norse haltr, Old High German halz, Gothic halts "lame"), from PIE *keld-, from root *kel- "to strike, cut," with derivatives meaning "something broken or cut off" (cf. Russian koldyka "lame," Greek kolobos "broken, curtailed"). The noun meaning "one who limps; the lame collectively" is from c.1200.

halt

v.

"to walk unsteadily," early 14c., from Old English haltian "to be lame," from the same source as halt (adj.). The meaning "make a halt" is 1650s, from halt (n.). As a command word, attested from 1796. Related: Halted; halting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with halter

halt

see call a halt; come to a halt; grind to a halt.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.