haver

2
[khah-ver]

noun, plural ha·ve·rim [khah-ve-reem] /ˌxɑ vɛˈrim/. Hebrew.

friend; comrade; companion.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for haverim

haver

verb (intr) British

to dither
Scot and Northern English dialect to talk nonsense; babble

noun

(usually plural) Scot nonsense

Word Origin for haver

C18: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for haverim

haver

n.1

"oats," Northern English, late 13c., probably from Old Norse hafre, from Proto-Germanic *habron- (cf. Old Norse hafri, Old Saxon havoro, Dutch haver, Old High German habaro, German Haber, Hafer). Buck suggests it is perhaps literally "goat-food" and compares Old Norse hafr "he-goat." "Haver is a common word in the northern countries for oats." [Johnson]

haver

n.2

"owner, possessor," late 14c., agent noun from have.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper