heather

[ heth-er ]
/ ˈhɛð ər /

noun

any of various heaths, especially Calluna vulgaris, of England and Scotland, having small, pinkish-purple flowers.

adjective

(of a yarn or fabric color) subtly flecked or mottled: all-cotton turtlenecks in your choice of five solid colors plus heather gray and heather green.

Origin of heather

1300–50; spelling variant of hether, earlier hedder, hadder, hather, Middle English hathir; akin to heath
Related formsheath·ered, adjective

Definition for heather (2 of 2)

Heather

[ heth-er ]
/ ˈhɛð ər /

noun

a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for heather

British Dictionary definitions for heather

heather

/ (ˈhɛðə) /

noun

Also called: ling, heath a low-growing evergreen Eurasian ericaceous shrub, Calluna vulgaris, that grows in dense masses on open ground and has clusters of small bell-shaped typically pinkish-purple flowers
any of certain similar plants
a purplish-red to pinkish-purple colour

adjective

of a heather colour
of or relating to interwoven yarns of mixed coloursheather mixture
Derived Formsheathered, adjectiveheathery, adjective

Word Origin for heather

C14: originally Scottish and Northern English, probably from heath
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for heather

heather


n.

early 14c., hathir, from Old English *hæddre, Scottish or northern England dialect name for Calluna vulgaris, probably altered by heath, but real connection to that word is unlikely [Liberman, OED]. Perhaps originally Celtic. As a fem. proper name little used in U.S. before 1935, but a top-15 name for girls born there 1971-1989.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper