heh

[hey]

he

2

or heh

[hey]
noun
  1. the fifth letter of the Hebrew alphabet.
  2. any of the sounds represented by this letter.

Origin of he

2
From the Hebrew word hēʾ
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for hehs

He

the chemical symbol for
  1. helium

HE

abbreviation for
  1. high explosive
  2. His Eminence
  3. His (or Her) Excellency

heh

1
interjection
  1. an exclamation of surprise or inquiry

heh

2

heh-heh (ˈhɛˈhɛ)

interjection
  1. an indication of sly amusement, used esp in electronic communication

he

1
pronoun (subjective)
  1. refers to a male person or animalhe looks interesting; he's a fine stallion
  2. refers to an indefinite antecedent such as one, whoever, or anybodyeverybody can do as he likes in this country
  3. refers to a person or animal of unknown or unspecified sexa member of the party may vote as he sees fit
noun
    1. a male person or animal
    2. (in combination)he-goat
    1. a children's game in which one player chases the others in an attempt to touch one of them, who then becomes the chaserCompare tag 2
    2. the person chasingCompare it 1 (def. 7)

Word Origin for he

Old English hē; related to Old Saxon hie, Old High German her he, Old Slavonic this, Latin cis on this side

he

2
noun
  1. the fifth letter of the Hebrew alphabet (ה), transliterated as h

he

3
interjection
  1. an expression of amusement or derisionAlso: he-he!, hee-hee!
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hehs

heh

mid-15c., originally an exclamation of emotions such as sorrow or surprise. As the sound of a light laugh, by 1808.

he

pron.

Old English he (see paradigm of Old English third person pronoun below), from Proto-Germanic *hi- (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch he, hi, Dutch hy, Old High German he), from PIE *ki-, variant of *ko-, the "this, here" (as opposed to "that, there") root (cf. Hittite ki "this," Greek ekeinos "that person," Old Church Slavonic si, Lithuanian šis "this"), and thus the source of the third person pronouns in Old English. The feminine, hio, was replaced in early Middle English by forms from other stems (see she), while the h- wore off Old English neuter hit to make modern it. The Proto-Germanic root also is the source of the first element in German heute "today," literally "the day" (cf. Old English heodæg).

caseSINGULAR--PLURAL
-masc.neut.fem.(all genders)
nom.hehitheo, hiohie, hi
acc.hinehithie, hihie, hi
gen.hishishirehira, heora
dat.himhimhirehim, heom

Pleonastic use with the noun ("Mistah Kurtz, he dead") is attested from late Old English. With animal words, meaning "male" (he-goat, etc.) from c.1300.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

hehs in Medicine

He

  1. The symbol for the elementhelium
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

hehs in Science

He

  1. The symbol for helium.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.