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henry

[ hen-ree ]
/ ˈhɛn ri /
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noun, plural hen·ries, hen·rys.Electricity.

the standard unit of inductance in the International System of Units (SI), formally defined to be the inductance of a closed circuit in which an electromotive force of one volt is produced when the electric current in the circuit varies uniformly at a rate of one ampere per second. Abbreviation: H

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Origin of henry

First recorded in 1890–95; named after J. Henry

Definition for henry (2 of 3)

Henry1
[ hen-ree ]
/ ˈhɛn ri /

noun

a .44 caliber lever-action repeating rifle, marketed in the U.S. in the early 1860s, using metallic cartridges and a tubular magazine capable of holding 16 rounds.

Origin of Henry

1
After Benjamin Tyler Henry (1821–98), U.S. inventor who designed it

Definition for henry (3 of 3)

Henry2
[ hen-ree ]
/ ˈhɛn ri /

noun

Joseph, 1797–1878, U.S. physicist.
O., pen name of William Sydney Porter.
Patrick, 1736–99, American patriot, orator, and statesman.
Cape, a cape in SE Virginia at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.
Fort. Fort Henry.
a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “home” and “kingdom.”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for henry

British Dictionary definitions for henry (1 of 2)

henry
/ (ˈhɛnrɪ) /

noun plural -ry, -ries or -rys

the derived SI unit of electric inductance; the inductance of a closed circuit in which an emf of 1 volt is produced when the current varies uniformly at the rate of 1 ampere per secondSymbol: H

Word Origin for henry

C19: named after Joseph Henry (1797–1878), US physicist

British Dictionary definitions for henry (2 of 2)

Henry
/ (ˈhɛnrɪ) /

noun

Joseph. 1797–1878, US physicist. He discovered the principle of electromagnetic induction independently of Faraday and constructed the first electromagnetic motor (1829). He also discovered self-induction and the oscillatory nature of electric discharges (1842)
Patrick. 1736–99, American statesman and orator, a leading opponent of British rule during the War of American Independence
Prince, known as Harry. born 1984, second son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Diana, Princess of Wales
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for henry

henry
[ hĕnrē ]

n. pl. hen•rys

The unit of inductance in which an induced electromotive force of one volt is produced when the current is varied at the rate of one ampere per second.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for henry (1 of 2)

henry
[ hĕnrē ]

A SI derived unit of electrical inductance, especially of transformers and inductance coils. A current changing at the rate of one ampere per second in a circuit with an inductance of one henry induces an electromotive force of one volt.

Scientific definitions for henry (2 of 2)

Henry
Joseph 1797-1878

American physicist who studied electromagnetic phenomena. He discovered electrical induction independently of Michael Faraday, and constructed a small electromagnetic motor in 1829. He also developed a system of weather forecasting based on meteorological observations. The henry unit of inductance is named for him.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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