heparin

[ hep-uh-rin ]
/ ˈhɛp ə rɪn /

noun

Biochemistry. a polysaccharide, occurring in various tissues, especially the liver, and having anticoagulent properties.
Pharmacology. a commercial form of this substance, obtained from the liver and lungs of domesticated food animals, that when injected into the blood prevents coagulation: used chiefly in the treatment of thrombosis.

Origin of heparin

1915–20; < Greek hêpar the liver + -in2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for heparin

heparin

/ (ˈhɛpərɪn) /

noun

a polysaccharide, containing sulphate groups, present in most body tissues: an anticoagulant used in the treatment of thrombosis

Derived Forms

heparinoid, adjective

Word Origin for heparin

C20: from Greek hēpar the liver + -in
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for heparin

heparin

[ hĕpər-ĭn ]

n.

A complex organic acid that is found especially in lung and liver tissue, has a mucopolysaccharide as its active constituent, prevents platelet agglutination and blood clotting, and is used in the form of its sodium salt in the treatment of thrombosis.

Related forms

hep′a•rin′i•zation (-ə-rĭn′ĭ-zāshən) n.hepa•rin•ize′ (-ər-ə-nīz′) v.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for heparin

heparin

[ hĕpər-ĭn ]

An acidic glycosaminoglycan found especially in lung and liver tissue that prevents the clotting of blood and is used intravenously in the treatment of thrombosis and embolism.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.