holdback

[ hohld-bak ]
/ ˈhoʊldˌbæk /

noun

the iron or strap on the shaft of a horse-drawn vehicle to which the breeching of the harness is attached, enabling the horse to hold back or to back the vehicle.
a device for restraining or checking, as a doorstop or tieback.
a stop or delay: a holdback in negotiations.
a withholding: the holdback of a day's pay.
something, as a planned expenditure or allotment, that is withheld or deferred.

QUIZZES

CAN YOU GUESS THESE WORDS FROM AROUND THE US?

American English is not always as it appears to be ... get to know regional words in this quiz!
Question 1 of 10
A bet is synonymous with a wager, but what does it mean in New York?

Origin of holdback

First recorded in 1575–85; noun use of verb phrase hold back
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for holdback

  • When the nerve is unduly irritated the holdback, or inhibitory force, is increased, and the heart slows up in the same measure.

    Special Report on Diseases of the Horse|United States Department of Agriculture
  • In the clouds we were passing over Clingman, Gibbs, and Holdback.

    On Horseback|Charles Dudley Warner
  • For this end, during eleven years, all had given their share without stint or holdback.

    Christine|Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

British Dictionary definitions for holdback

hold back

verb (adverb)

to restrain or be restrained
(tr) to withholdhe held back part of the payment

noun holdback

a strap of the harness joining the breeching to the shaft, so that the horse can hold back the vehicle
something that restrains or hinders
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with holdback

hold back

Also, keep back.

1

Retain in one's possession or control, as in He held back vital information, or I managed to keep back my tears. [First half of 1500s]

2

Restrain one-self, as in She held back from joining the others, or I wanted to denounce him right there, but I kept back for fear of making a scene. The first usage dates from the second half of the 1500s, the variant from the early 1800s.

3

Impede the progress of, as in The barriers held back traffic during the funeral procession, or Her daughter was kept back and had to repeat first grade.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.