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hombre1

[om-ber]
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noun Cards.
  1. omber.
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hombre2

[om-brey, -bree]
noun
  1. man; fellow; guy: That sheriff is a mean hombre.
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Origin of hombre2

1830–40; < Spanish, by dissimilation and intrusion of b < Vulgar Latin *omne, for Latin hominem, accusative of homō man, Homo

omber

or hom·bre

[om-ber]
noun
  1. a card game popular in the 17th and 18th centuries and played, usually by three persons, with 40 cards.
  2. the player undertaking to win the pool in this game.
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Also especially British, om·bre.

Origin of omber

1650–60; < French (h)ombre < Spanish hombre literally, man < Latin hominem, accusative of homō man. See Homo
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for hombre

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • "There's only one form of persuasion to use with an hombre," commented Henderson, gently.

    Still Jim

    Honor Willsie Morrow

  • They've just brought an hombre with a crushed leg into the hospital.

    Still Jim

    Honor Willsie Morrow

  • The hombre who had been driving the mule had gone for ropes.

    Still Jim

    Honor Willsie Morrow

  • Cold as it is, a little fightin' would warm an hombre up some.

    Ride Proud, Rebel!

    Andre Alice Norton

  • I don't cotton to Keith myse'f, because he ain't my kind of a hombre.

    Rimrock Trail

    J. Allan Dunn


British Dictionary definitions for hombre

hombre1

noun
  1. Western US a slang word for man
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Word Origin

C19: from Spanish: man

hombre2

noun
  1. a variant of ombre
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hombre

n.

"a man" (especially one of Spanish descent), 1846, from Spanish, from Latin hominem, accusative of homo "man" (see homunculus).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper