definitions
  • synonyms

hurrah

[ huh-rah, -raw ]
/ həˈrɑ, -ˈrɔ /
||
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR hurrah ON THESAURUS.COM

interjection

(used as an exclamation of joy, exultation, appreciation, encouragement, or the like.)

verb (used without object)

to shout “hurrah.”

noun

an exclamation of “hurrah.”
hubbub; commotion; fanfare.
a colorful or tumultuous event; spectacle or celebration: We celebrated the centennial with a three-day hurrah.

RELATED CONTENT

15 New And Unique Ways to Say “Congratulations”Whether it's a graduation, wedding ceremony, or a winning game ... sometimes "congratulations" just isn't enough. That's why we've rounded up 15 new ways to congratulate someone.
READ MORE

RELATED WORDS

cheer, yell, encouragement, whoopee, yay, hurray, huzza, rah-rah, yippee

Nearby words

hurly-burly, hurok, hurok, sol, huron, huron, lake, hurrah, hurray, hurri, hurrian, hurricane, hurricane deck

Idioms

    last/final hurrah, a final moment or occasion of glory or achievement: The new play will be her last hurrah as an actress before she retires.
Also hur·ray [huh-rey] /həˈreɪ/, hooray, hoorah.

Origin of hurrah

First recorded in 1680–90, hurrah is from the German word hurra
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hurrah

British Dictionary definitions for hurrah

hurrah

hooray (huːˈreɪ) or hurray (hʊˈreɪ)

/ (hʊˈrɑː) /

interjection, noun

a cheer of joy, victory, etc

verb

to shout "hurrah"

Word Origin for hurrah

C17: probably from German hurra; compare huzzah
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hurrah

hurrah


1680s, alteration of huzza, similar to shouts recorded in German, Danish, Swedish. Perhaps picked up during Thirty Years' War. Hurra was said to be the battle-cry of Prussian soldiers during the War of Liberation (1812-13). Hooray is its popular form and is almost as old. Also hurray (1780); hurroo (1824); hoorah (1798).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper