idyll

or i·dyl

[ ahyd-l ]
/ ˈaɪd l /

noun

a poem or prose composition, usually describing pastoral scenes or events or any charmingly simple episode, appealing incident, or the like.
a simple descriptive or narrative piece in verse or prose.
material suitable for such a work.
an episode or scene of idyllic charm.
a brief or inconsequential romantic affair.
Music. a composition, usually instrumental, of a pastoral or sentimental character.

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Origin of idyll

First recorded in1595–1605; from Latin īdyllium from Greek eidýllion “short pastoral poem,” equivalent to eíd(os) “form” + -yllion diminutive suffix

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH idyll

idle, idol, idyll

Words nearby idyll

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for idyll

British Dictionary definitions for idyll

idyll

sometimes US idyl

/ (ˈɪdɪl) /

noun

a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc
any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
a charming or picturesque scene or event
a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character

Word Origin for idyll

C17: from Latin īdyllium, from Greek eidullion, from eidos shape, (literary) form
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012