idyll

or i·dyl

[ahyd-l]
See more synonyms for idyll on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a poem or prose composition, usually describing pastoral scenes or events or any charmingly simple episode, appealing incident, or the like.
  2. a simple descriptive or narrative piece in verse or prose.
  3. material suitable for such a work.
  4. an episode or scene of idyllic charm.
  5. a brief or inconsequential romantic affair.
  6. Music. a composition, usually instrumental, of a pastoral or sentimental character.

Origin of idyll

1595–1605; < Latin īdyllium < Greek eidýllion short pastoral poem, equivalent to eíd(os) form + -yllion diminutive suffix
Can be confusedidle idol idyll (see synonym study at idle)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for idyll

Contemporary Examples of idyll

  • The Rambagh seems to effortlessly have the sense of a refuge and idyll that luxury hotels the world over try so hard to conjure.

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    Living Like a Maharajah

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    January 22, 2010

Historical Examples of idyll


British Dictionary definitions for idyll

idyll

sometimes US idyl

noun
  1. a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc
  2. any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
  3. a charming or picturesque scene or event
  4. a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character

Word Origin for idyll

C17: from Latin īdyllium, from Greek eidullion, from eidos shape, (literary) form
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for idyll
n.

also idyl, c.1600, "picturesque pastoral poem," from Latin idyllium, from Greek eidyllion "short, descriptive poem, usually of rustic or pastoral type," literally "a little picture," diminutive of eidos "form" (see -oid).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper