illusory

[ih-loo-suh-ree, -zuh-]

Origin of illusory

1590–1600; < Late Latin illūsōrius, equivalent to illūd(ere) to mock, ridicule (see illusion) + -tōrius -tory1
Related formsil·lu·so·ri·ly, adverbil·lu·so·ri·ness, nounun·il·lu·so·ry, adjective
Can be confusedelusive illusory

Synonyms for illusory

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for illusoriness

Historical Examples of illusoriness


British Dictionary definitions for illusoriness

illusory

illusive (ɪˈluːsɪv)

adjective
  1. producing, produced by, or based on illusion; deceptive or unreal
Derived Formsillusorily or illusively, adverbillusoriness or illusiveness, noun

usage

Illusive is sometimes wrongly used where elusive is meant: they fought hard, but victory remained elusive (not illusive)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for illusoriness

illusory

adj.

1590s, from French illusorie, from Late Latin illusorius "ironical, of a mocking character," from illus-, past participle stem of Latin illudere "mock at," literally "to play with," from assimilated form of in- "at, upon" (see in- (2)) + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper