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imagination

[ ih-maj-uh-ney-shuhn ]
/ ɪˌmædʒ əˈneɪ ʃən /
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noun

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Origin of imagination

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English, Middle French, from Latin imāginātiōn- (stem of imāginātiō ) “mental image, fancy,” equivalent to imāgināt(us), past participle of the verb imāginārī imagine (imāgin-, stem of imāgō image + -ātus -ate1) + -iōn- -ion

synonym study for imagination

3. See fancy.

OTHER WORDS FROM imagination

i·mag·i·na·tion·al, adjectivenon·im·ag·i·na·tion·al, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for imagination

British Dictionary definitions for imagination

imagination
/ (ɪˌmædʒɪˈneɪʃən) /

noun

the faculty or action of producing ideas, esp mental images of what is not present or has not been experienced
mental creative ability
the ability to deal resourcefully with unexpected or unusual problems, circumstances, etc
(in romantic literary criticism, esp that of S. T. Coleridge) a creative act of perception that joins passive and active elements in thinking and imposes unity on the poetic materialCompare fancy (def. 9)

Derived forms of imagination

imaginational, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with imagination

imagination

see figment of one's imagination.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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